Golf Ball Compression - The Squish Factor

Golf ball compression is a word or a term that applies to the density of your golf ball. What it really means for the average golfer: is a form of measurement that tells the player how hard or soft the golf ball really is.

How Do You Tell the Compression?
Some golf balls will have little number tattooed or marked on the side of the golf ball. Other golf ball manufacturers have gone a head and listed the compression right on the packages of the balls when you purchase them along with an explanation. These numbers or compression measurements range form 70 to 110 depending on the type of ball.

What do these numbers mean? Well, a ball with a number 70 marked on it means it is one of the softer balls on the market. Vice versa for the ones marked with 110. These number listings were more prevalent in the 1990's and no so much now due the advancements in technology in the golf balls.

When the golfer hits the ball with the club it is basically squished flat at the moment of impact. That golf ball then springs back into its original shape. This type of ball would have a lower or softer compression rating. (Squished easier at impact) A golf ball that is harder or has a higher compression number will take more energy and strength to squish the ball at impact.

A general rule of thumb about golf ball compression is that players with a lower swing speed should use a lower compression ball to take advantage of the added spring affect. A golfer with a higher swing speed should use a higher compression golf ball so they don't squish it to much and loose the effect of the ball.

Myths About Compression
A myth about compression is that higher compression balls will travel further. That is not true or all balls would have the highest number possible to get the added distance. One other thing to remember is that outside air temperature can have an effect on which ball you should be using. When its colder outside a higher compression ball will feel like a rock because of its density mixed with cold weather. You might loose a little feel under these conditions and prefer going to a lower compressed ball.

Don't let the density number on the ball determine which ball you use, you have to try each type out to see which one suits you better. The golf ball compression is actually there to help you maximize your game. So take advantage of it when you can.

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